The Cycle of Accidental Systemic Discrimination

 

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Integrating eramps into technology environments can be complex. IT people are busy and technology is very hard to keep up with. That is one important reason why trainers and consultants are used. It is also why eramps, if given any consideration, are usually at the bottom of the list for these busy people. Unfortunately, this tends to create an accidental but real self-stroking cycle of systemic discrimination:

  • Lack of attention to eramps creates inaccessible technology working environments, resulting in...
  • Information and communication becoming more difficult to access by employees with disabilities, resulting in...
  • People who are artificially handicapped in their ability to compete in the employment marketplace, resulting in...
  • Fewer persons with disabilities getting hired or promoted, resulting in...
  • Artificially lower percentage of employees with disabilities in the organization, resulting in...
  • Lower priority by IT support and systems designers who are already operating under tight deadlines and demanding users, resulting in...
  • Lack of attention to eramps...

The sad irony in all of this is that there is considerable support by senior management for the implementation of eramps (although the terms used differ), and most IT people, given the knowledge, skills, and resources would gladly implement technologies that were accessible to employees with disabilities. In addition, within the federal public sector the Employment Equity (EE) Act compels government departments, agencies, and federally regulated corporations to comply to a set of regulations designed to remove employment barriers for the benefit of specific groups of people - of which persons with disabilities are included. These requirements insist that people with disabilities have the right to be accommodated in the workplace specifically and society in general.